Atonement

Atonement is another aspect of Salvation. Before we get started, we will review the 3-phase Salvation model presented in the first essay. Salvation is an event followed by a process ending in another event with the removal of sin forever. That is the full scope of Salvation. Before we enter the "Saved" state, we lived and acted as the world does. For the sinful nature, we have before being "saved," Jesus removes the guilt and penalty via His death on the cross. See Luke 7:50; 1 Cor. 1:18; 2 Cor. 2:15; 2 Tim. 1:9, Eph 2:8, Tit 3:5. The present tense releases believers from the power, or dominion, of sin. Faith is still the means for maturation in Christ (John 17:17; Rom. 6:14; 8:2; Gal. 5:16; Phil. 2:12–13, Heb. 7:25). The future tense removes sin from our presence (Rom. 13:11; Eph. 5:25–27; Phil. 1:6; 1 Pet. 1:3–5; 1 John 3:1–2, Rom. 5:9–10).[1,2]

Individuals throughout history inherit Adam's sinful nature. Yes, this would mean Adam is real in the Bible. This nature prevents any personal relationship with the Lord. Atonement is the act that allows humans to overcome this separation and enter into a personal relationship.[3] In dying for the sins of the world, Jesus Christ fulfilled and replaced the OT sacrificial system, so that all who believe in him are restored to fellowship with God. Christ is the true high priest, who finally liberates his people from the guilt of sin by offering himself as the supreme sacrifice. This act of love by Jesus allows people the opportunity for Salvation. The release from the penalty of sin.


Why did Jesus Christ die on the cross?

The purpose was the reconciliation of individuals to the Lord through Jesus Christ. Remember Jn. 3:16? The sacrifice of God's only begotten Son was an act of love, including those not even born at the time! Jn. 10:11 indicates Jesus is our shepherd who laid His life for the opportunity to be reconciled with the Lord.

Jn. 10:14-18 – Jesus repeats vs. 11 and makes clear that all people belong to Him, not just the Jews in the audience. At that time, sheep herding was a common occupation. The shepherds would bring their sheep to a single protected area for the night. In the morning, each shepherd calls his sheep, and the sheep follow the voice they know to pasture. This analogy applies to humanity in that when Jesus draws folks to Salvation. The passage closes with Jesus stating he has the authority to lay down His life and accomplished this task voluntarily for us.

2 Corinthians 5:15 - For those that accept the invitation to Salvation, we can now live for Jesus rather than follow Satan's domain.

Hebrews 2:9 - Jesus appeared into our timeline, lived as a human, laid aside His deity, and chose to die for his "sheep." We will repeat this as it is the ultimate act of love (1 Jn. 3:16).

What is the result of Jesus Christ's atoning death for sin?

1 Corinthians 15:3-4 – (You should probably read the first eight verses). This passage is a concise description of the Gospel message. These verses confirm different aspects of the Corinthians passage: Ro 4:25; Ro 8:3; Ga 1:4; 1 Pe 3:18

Why does atonement have to involve death and blood?

The New Testament summarizes that the shedding of blood (sacrificing animals in the Old Testament), there can be no forgiveness of sins (Heb. 9:22). When Christ died on the cross, we have the opportunity to be saved from the penalty of sin. Rom. 5:9 calls this the "wrath of God." Unsaved folks are at war with the Lord. Salvation is how we are at peace with God. Rev 5:9 states that Christ's work on the cross is for all people: black, white, Indian, Chinese. See also Eph 2:13; 1 Pe 1:18–19; 1 Jn 1:7; Re 7:14 .

Blood is mentioned during Communion. What's that about?

Some religions accuse Jesus of cannibalism. What the Last Supper does is commemorate what Jesus did on the cross. He never ate himself, nor do we eat what's left of Him – the supply would have run out long ago. When we read 1 Cor. 11:23-25, it clearly states we are doing Communion to remember what Jesus did. The Gospel of Matthew (26:26-28) never indicates the apostles ate Jesus. Instead, Jesus instituted a ritual to remind believers what he accomplished for His sheep.

[1] Chafer, L. S. (1993). In Systematic theology (Vol. 7, p. 273). Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications. [2] Ryrie, C. C. (1999). Basic Theology: A Popular Systematic Guide to Understanding Biblical Truth (pp. 318–319). Chicago, IL: Moody Press. [3] Lyon, R. W., & Toon, P. (1988). Atonement. In Baker encyclopedia of the Bible (Vol. 1, p. 231). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House. [4]

Footnotes:


[1] Chafer, L. S. (1993). In Systematic theology (Vol. 7, p. 273). Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications.

[2] Ryrie, C. C. (1999). Basic Theology: A Popular Systematic Guide to Understanding Biblical Truth (pp. 318–319). Chicago, IL: Moody Press.

[3] Lyon, R. W., & Toon, P. (1988). Atonement. In Baker encyclopedia of the Bible (Vol. 1, p. 231). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.

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